Angela Stradwick, BND, APD, AN

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Welcome to Autumn.

Inside this season’s bloom nutrition studio newsletter are our top tips for boosting your family’s health with plant power!

The Mediterranean diet, nuts for health, top tips for lunch boxes, a great chickpea burger recipe and more!

So sit back and take a look, here! We hope it brings lots of plant based inspiration to your family table this season!

 

Angela @ Bloom

 


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Hello Summer and (almost) Hello Christmas!

 

Who else is ready for the Christmas break?! Here at Bloom Nutrition Studio we most definitely are! So we’ve put together a little selection of our favourite tips and tricks for coming out on top during our hot Aussie Christmas season. Click here to read!

 

We hope you enjoy it, and most of all, we hope you have a safe, happy and healthy festive season!

x Angela @ Bloom


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Preparing school lunch boxes can feel a little like ground hog day.

And no wonder, as kids go to school for around 200 days per year! But fear not… if you’re in need of a little school lunch inspo, you’ve come to the right place!

Bloom’s winter newsletter for 2019 is all about lunches and lunch boxes. Get ready for the low down on the boxes we love, and how to fill them with nutritious, tasty food your kids actually want to eat! Favourite sandwich fillings, great non-sandwich lunch ideas, dietitian approved packaged snacks, and more.

We hope our tips and tricks help hit the spot. Click here to start reading!

 

X Angela @ Bloom


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You’ve heard it before – it’s famed as the most important meal of the day. But why is breakfast so good?

Breakfast, literally, breaks the fast from overnight, fuelling your body with energy and nutrients for the day ahead. So, breakfast is like the platform you use to dive into the day. Start the day right and the day ahead is looking good from the get-go!

In nutrition research, eating breakfast is linked to many good things. There’s an association between eating breakfast and maintaining a healthy weight, as well as increased overall nutrient intakes for key nutrients like fibre, calcium, iron, folate and vitamin C. Research suggests skipping breakfast impairs cognitive performance (so little brains don’t work as well!) , and there are associations between skipping breakfast and an increased risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Back in 2014, an Australian Bureau of Statistics Census at School Survey found that as many as 1 in 7 kids weren’t eating breakfast on a given day. And similar numbers of adults were found to skip breaky back in the 2013 Australian Health Survey, and 2012 National Nutrition Survey. So if this is a common occurrence in your house, it’s time to take action!

Set aside even as little as 5-10 extra minutes in the morning routine to sit and eat.  And given that breakfast is one-third of our main meals, it makes sense to make it count nutritionally.

Breakfasts higher in protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals, and lower in free sugars are the way to go.

How do we do this? It’s as simple as choosing minimally processed foods, (like food from the major groups of the Australian Guide to Healthy eating, or AGHE, below), and getting your kids on board with the choices! When kids have some input and ownership of the meals that are chosen for the family, they’re more likely to eat them.

When talking to kids I love using the analogy of foods that make you GO, GROW and GLOW.

GO foods are the grains or carbohydrate sources – the yellow area from the AGHE. They provide energy, fibre and if you’re choosing whole grains, lots of metabolism-boosting B vitamins.

GROW foods are what you might typically think as the protein sources – meat, eggs, nuts, dairy – giving protein and essential nutrients like iron, calcium, phosphorous, zinc – important for building muscles and bones. These are the blue and purple sections of the AGHE.

GLOW foods are those foods that help your body feel great – they’re from green sections of the AGHE. Filled with fruits and vegetables, they’re packed with all the good stuff –  fibre, prebiotics, and a whole host of vitamins and minerals.

So a breaky that ticks all 3 big GO, GROW and GLOW boxes is a great start.

How do we achieve this? Try some of the easy ideas below:

·     A smoothie (milk, yoghurt and fresh fruit) & a slice or two of grainy toast with your favourite topping

·     Grainy granola, with oats, dried fruit, nuts, seeds, served with milk or yoghurt

·     A breakfast wrap – multigrain wrap, filled with scrambled eggs, tomato and spinach

·     A jaffle, made with wholemeal bread, filled with baked beans and cheese

·     Good old fashioned porridge oats made with milk, and topped with banana and cinnamon

·     Rye sourdough with tomato, avocado and crumbled feta

The list goes on!

So give your family breakfast the once over. Look at what you’re regularly serving, and where you might have gaps. Pop in something from the food group that’s missing to give your breaky a nutrient boost and supercharge your day!

 


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It’s that time again… With the change of seasons comes a new Bloom Nutrition Studio seasonal nutrition newsletter. Hurrah!

 

This Autumn we’re sharing our top tips to start the day right, with our gorgeous new Breakfast Issue.

 

Planning better breakfasts, breakfast in a hurry, long and lazy weekend breakfasts, and some awesome new recipes await inside.

 

Sit back, relax, and have a read. We hope it brings lots of delicious, nutritious inspiration to your family breakfast table.

 

x Angela @ Bloom  🌿


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The thought of an Aussie summer often conjures up images of whole days spent outside being active in the sunshine. The reality with little children however can end up being quite different!

So how do your keep your young family safe, active and sane during the super hot Aussie summer holidays? Here are some tips to try to keep those little bodies moving…

* Schedule activity for early morning or late afternoon, when the weather is cooler and the UV index away from its peak.

* Try water based activities – swimming, sprinkler fun, slip n slide, or hit the beach!

* If it’s really hot, indoor activities like air-conditioned play cafes or dance classes can be a great way to burn up kids energy!

* For something a little more zen, try learning something new, like a family yoga class.

* For a little DIY family fitness, try your own YouTube guided in home fun like Cosmic Kids yoga, or Go-Noodle yoga, dance and fitness videos. If you’re anything like my crew, you’ll all be laughing and moving at the same time!

When getting active in the warmer weather, don’t forget:

Keep up the fluids!
Water is the best drink for kids. Don’t forget to fill your drink bottle before heading out. If you’re hanging at home, have fun with fruit and herb flavoured waters, ice blocks or slushies, or home-made iced fruit teas etc. Drinks big on added sugars like juice drinks, sports drinks and soft drinks aren’t needed for kids.

Pack a snack.
Active kids are hungry kids, so if you’re heading out, fill the cooler bag with an ice brick and a stack of healthy snacks. Head to our website for some great ideas!

Be sun safe.
Vitamin D is an important nutrient in our bodies, which we get both from our diet and when it is synthesised by our skin. While a little sun exposure is healthy, but too much puts skin at risk. Stay out of the sun at peak sun exposure times, wear a hat, sun safe clothing, and sunscreen where it’s needed. Visit the Cancer Council website for guidelines in your area about healthy exposure and sun protection

… and most of all, don’t forget to join in, and have fun!


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Busy lives call for time savers. There’s no doubt about it.

But taking short cuts need not mean missing out on fuelling your family with the good stuff!

A few sneaky strategies can help you get ahead with your families nutrition, so you don’t feel like you are falling behind when the business of life gets in the way!

COOK ONCE – EAT TWICE

It can be hard to get into the kitchen with enough time to make a full meal every night – so don’t! Call on those meal items that can be made into a dinner on multiple nights of the week! Quickly store extras safely in the fridge if you plan to use them in the next night or two, or tuck them away into the freezer to defrost for a later date.

Roasting a chicken? Pop in 2 or 3! Left overs are perfect for chicken noodle salad, noodle soup, chicken salad wraps, pulled chicken tacos, chicken and vegetable fried rice…. the list goes on!

Like salmon? Rather than panfrying a few fillets for dinner, think about oven baking a whole side of salmon. Leftovers can be used in things like homemade sushi, soba noodle and asian vegetable salad, in a rice poke bowl, added to a pasta with pesto and peas, or with a quick slaw to to top jacket potatoes.

Got a great recipe for bolognese or a veg pumped napolitana sauce? Grab your biggest pot and make a double or triple quantity. Use it for meals like lasagne, scrolls, mini pizzas, pasta, even a quick jaffle! Check out Julia’s great vegetarian lasagne on page 10  of our Summer Nutrition Newsletter for inspiration.

SPEEDY SUPPERS

Don’t forget it’s totally ok to go pre-prepared when you are short on time. And not every dinner needs to be a gastronomic affair!

There are lots of nutritious quick options available these days. Aim for items that are minimally processed, and big on real, fresh ingredients. Check the nutrition panel for the ingredient list, and to watch the salt, fat and sugar content too.

If you know your week ahead includes some busy or late nights, think about adding these to your shopping trolley…

Proteins: Canned tuna, smoked salmon, frozen marinated chicken breasts or fish fillets, hummus dip or canned legumes of your choice!

Grains: Microwave rice and quinoa, flat breads, pizza bases, whole sourdough loaves, quick cook fresh pasta.

Veg: No prep veg like avocados, mini cucumbers, cherry tomatoes and baby spinach, pre-made salad bags, pre-cut roasting veggies, antipasto vegetable mix, or even pre-made fresh vegetable soups. Don’t forget frozen veggies like edamame, chopped spinach or kale that can be quickly heated and added to your speedy meal… anything you like to get you to your 2&5!

x Angela


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Hello Sunshine!

The warm weather has finally arrived her in Adelaide, and holiday season is on it’s way, giving us all the more reason to get out and about.
 
Click below for your own little copy of Bloom Nutrition Studio’s Newsletter for Summer 18-19, packed with lots of great tips to keep your family happy, active and well fed this season.

Bloom summer 1819


Happy Summer!
x Bloom 🌿


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We all know there are plenty of reasons to use less ‘single use plastics’ in feeding our families.

 

The impact of pollution from plastic production and waste on the environment, and then the recycling crisis quickly come to mind. But there’s also the recent statement from the American Academy of Paediatrics about children’s health and reducing the contact of food with certain types of plastic. (You can read more about it in Julia’s article here). It all makes you stop and think.

 

In our home we have always recycled, and have a compost, a worm farm, and chooks to help with our waste management. But it’s recently been drawn to our attention that this isn’t enough. So we have begun reducing what we buy and use with plastic, and have looked into a range of reusable, plastic free options (and ensuring the plastics we do use are food safe and heat safe). 

 

In doing this though, the issue of food safety of reusable items around food kept popping up.

 

A barista in my local cafe said that some shops were refusing to use reusable take away coffee cups as they may not be properly cleaned. A university nutritionist discussed hazards of beeswax wraps in children’s lunch boxes- they’re a biological material that is not heat stable – a potential gold mine for bugs. The issue of the bacteria E. coli in reusable shopping bags, identified many years ago, also came to mind. (Which you can read about here.)

 

So, in choosing reusable products, I wondered, does it mean we are putting our families at risk of illness? Well, no – it doesn’t have to, but it does require a little elbow grease!

 

I spent some time looking at commercial food safety information to help guide our practice in the home. And from all this the key point seems to be that food storage products that can be successfully reused, need to be regularly, easily, thoroughly cleaned. Even our shopping bags!

 

The principals of commercial food safety – used in food manufacturing and commercial kitchens – tell us that to be free of those nasty bugs, surfaces that come in contact with food need to be both cleaned and sanitised.

 

Cleaning refers to the removal of food and other types of deposits from a surface that comes in contact with food. Types of cleaners include detergents, solvent cleaners, acid cleaners and abrasive cleaners – and they need to be food safe. For in home use, detergents and abrasives seem to be the most widespread affordable and practical methods.

 

Sanitisation however, means decreasing the number of microorganisms that are on a properly cleaned surface, to a safe level. An item needs to be properly cleaned, otherwise it is not possible for the sanitiser to effectively work on the surface.  

 

Sanitisaton can be via heat, chemicals, pH changes or UV irradiation. A range of methods are available to commercial kitchens and food production facilities. Chemical and pH sanitizers are generally only used in the home environment for surface preparation – think bleaches and sprays, or even vinegar that may be used on sinks and bench tops. Heat is an other great method that can be transferred into the home.

 

So to adequately clean and sanitise reusable food storage products to prevent food borne illness, what should we do?

 

First choose the right re-usable products. This means those made out of food safe materials, that can be effectively cleaned. If something has hard to reach crevices, or is made of a material that can not be put in hot water or the dishwasher or washing machine this raises some red flags. 

 

If hand washing, clean major food soiling using a food safe detergent and abrasive – good old fashioned dish detergent on a soft scourer is fine. There should be no visible material left.

A trip through the hot cycle of a dishwasher will sanitise products too. Or for fabric products like sandwich wraps, snack pockets and produce and shopping bags, a separate hot cycle of the washing machine. Otherwise a separate clean sink of hot water at 77 degrees celsius is recommended here by Food Standards Australia New Zealand. For other products, alcohol wipes or undiluted vinegar can also sometime be used. (For my family, I’ve started using more silicone, stainless steel and cotton canvas products that can all go in the hot cycle of the dishwasher, or the washing machine.)

 

Sticking to your most basic principals of food hygiene is essential too – always washing utensils, washing produce, washing hands. And food needs to be appropriately stored, with high risk foods being kept out of the temperature danger zone of 5-60 degrees celsius, and following the 2 hour/4 hour rule of food temperature storage. You can read more about that here from FSANZ too.

 

While it can seem like a little more effort than throw away single use products  – it is worth giving a go. Bulk food purchases and reusable products done right can mean a healthier family, healthier environment, and can help you save money too. 

 

Little changes all add up!

 

x Angela @ Bloom


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Eating seasonally is great – especially for fruit and vegetable intake. It means you are choosing produce at its peak and when it’s in its natural form it is burning with great nutrition – energy, vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients and fibre! What’s a good option if your kids aren’t great fruit or veg eaters? Smoothies!

In fact, smoothies are a great way to get extra fruit and veggies in the diet for kids, and adults too! They are a perfect breakfast on the run, or quick after school snack. Made right they can be big on nutritional value too. Here are a few of our favourite tips to guide your smoothie making;

Use fruit and veggies that are in season, or frozen fruit, to keep flavours at their best and prices down.

Keep to one colour group, like reds or greens, to avoid everything turning beige or brown!

If you’re after a more filling smoothie, add some protein in the form of a good quality yoghurt, some healthy fats from ripe avocado, or try a tablespoon of seeds or nut butter for a little of both!

Here are a few of our current Spring favourites:

Monkey nut:
Low fat milk, banana, ground sunflower seeds, nut butter, honey, greek yoghurt, ice

Hulk:
Pear, cucumber, baby spinach, avocado, banana, ice.

Princess Punch:
Strawberry yoghurt, frozen strawberries, frozen raspberries, 1 tsp chia seeds, water and ice

Best Ever Banana:
Banana, greek yoghurt, maple syrup, 1 tsp cinnamon, milk and ice

 

We hope you love them too – and can get in the kitchen and develop a few of your own family favourites!


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Feel that sunshine on your skin!

 

Spring has arrived. The sun is in the sky and the trees are in bloom. Sit back and enjoy our Spring Nutrition Newsletter, with lots of great nutrition news, recipes and family eating tips for the season.

 

We break down getting kids into the kitchen, the new American Academy of Paediatrics statement on additives and child health and what it means for food storage, vegan diets for children, and a host of nutrition tips and recipes.

 

Take a look inside!

 

Cheers,

Click here!

x Bloom 🌿