Bloom

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We all know there are plenty of reasons to use less ‘single use plastics’ in feeding our families.

 

The impact of pollution from plastic production and waste on the environment, and then the recycling crisis quickly come to mind. But there’s also the recent statement from the American Academy of Paediatrics about children’s health and reducing the contact of food with certain types of plastic. (You can read more about it in Julia’s article here). It all makes you stop and think.

 

In our home we have always recycled, and have a compost, a worm farm, and chooks to help with our waste management. But it’s recently been drawn to our attention that this isn’t enough. So we have begun reducing what we buy and use with plastic, and have looked into a range of reusable, plastic free options (and ensuring the plastics we do use are food safe and heat safe). 

 

In doing this though, the issue of food safety of reusable items around food kept popping up.

 

A barista in my local cafe said that some shops were refusing to use reusable take away coffee cups as they may not be properly cleaned. A university nutritionist discussed hazards of beeswax wraps in children’s lunch boxes- they’re a biological material that is not heat stable – a potential gold mine for bugs. The issue of the bacteria E. coli in reusable shopping bags, identified many years ago, also came to mind. (Which you can read about here.)

 

So, in choosing reusable products, I wondered, does it mean we are putting our families at risk of illness? Well, no – it doesn’t have to, but it does require a little elbow grease!

 

I spent some time looking at commercial food safety information to help guide our practice in the home. And from all this the key point seems to be that food storage products that can be successfully reused, need to be regularly, easily, thoroughly cleaned. Even our shopping bags!

 

The principals of commercial food safety – used in food manufacturing and commercial kitchens – tell us that to be free of those nasty bugs, surfaces that come in contact with food need to be both cleaned and sanitised.

 

Cleaning refers to the removal of food and other types of deposits from a surface that comes in contact with food. Types of cleaners include detergents, solvent cleaners, acid cleaners and abrasive cleaners – and they need to be food safe. For in home use, detergents and abrasives seem to be the most widespread affordable and practical methods.

 

Sanitisation however, means decreasing the number of microorganisms that are on a properly cleaned surface, to a safe level. An item needs to be properly cleaned, otherwise it is not possible for the sanitiser to effectively work on the surface.  

 

Sanitisaton can be via heat, chemicals, pH changes or UV irradiation. A range of methods are available to commercial kitchens and food production facilities. Chemical and pH sanitizers are generally only used in the home environment for surface preparation – think bleaches and sprays, or even vinegar that may be used on sinks and bench tops. Heat is an other great method that can be transferred into the home.

 

So to adequately clean and sanitise reusable food storage products to prevent food borne illness, what should we do?

 

First choose the right re-usable products. This means those made out of food safe materials, that can be effectively cleaned. If something has hard to reach crevices, or is made of a material that can not be put in hot water or the dishwasher or washing machine this raises some red flags. 

 

If hand washing, clean major food soiling using a food safe detergent and abrasive – good old fashioned dish detergent on a soft scourer is fine. There should be no visible material left.

A trip through the hot cycle of a dishwasher will sanitise products too. Or for fabric products like sandwich wraps, snack pockets and produce and shopping bags, a separate hot cycle of the washing machine. Otherwise a separate clean sink of hot water at 77 degrees celsius is recommended here by Food Standards Australia New Zealand. For other products, alcohol wipes or undiluted vinegar can also sometime be used. (For my family, I’ve started using more silicone, stainless steel and cotton canvas products that can all go in the hot cycle of the dishwasher, or the washing machine.)

 

Sticking to your most basic principals of food hygiene is essential too – always washing utensils, washing produce, washing hands. And food needs to be appropriately stored, with high risk foods being kept out of the temperature danger zone of 5-60 degrees celsius, and following the 2 hour/4 hour rule of food temperature storage. You can read more about that here from FSANZ too.

 

While it can seem like a little more effort than throw away single use products  – it is worth giving a go. Bulk food purchases and reusable products done right can mean a healthier family, healthier environment, and can help you save money too. 

 

Little changes all add up!

 

x Angela @ Bloom


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Feel that sunshine on your skin!

 

Spring has arrived. The sun is in the sky and the trees are in bloom. Sit back and enjoy our Spring Nutrition Newsletter, with lots of great nutrition news, recipes and family eating tips for the season.

 

We break down getting kids into the kitchen, the new American Academy of Paediatrics statement on additives and child health and what it means for food storage, vegan diets for children, and a host of nutrition tips and recipes.

 

Take a look inside!

 

Cheers,

Click here!

x Bloom 🌿


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Have you ever sent out birthday party invitations, with a polite little “Let us know if you have any food allergies” at the bottom, only to be faced with a wave of responses you weren’t expecting? 

Well – keep calm, and carry on. With a little know how, feeding kids with food allergies is totally manageable – and actually kind of fun! Here’s our go to guide to keep you on the right track…

Start by making a list of the kids with allergies, and those ingredients that you need to avoid. Then decide what party food you will make and buy, and match them up. At the end of your food planning, make sure there are at least one or two safe options available for each child on the list.

You can generally cater the needs of the kiddy crowd, including those with common allergies, with a few simple staples. Fruit kebabs or platters, fruit juice icy poles, fairy bread (with milk free bread and milk free margarine), plain potato chips or crips, and popcorn made with only oil, salt and or plain icing sugar are a good start. 

The main event however, the birthday cake, can be the tricky one to cater. And in this regard, cupcakes can be a lifesaver. You can substitute out different ingredients easily, and make a few different batches for different kids if need be.

If you’ve got a favourite cupcake recipe you want to use, try these modification tips:

Gluten free or wheat allergy? 

Use a premix gluten/wheat free flour (like Bob’s Red Mill, Vitarium, Schar, FG Roberts or Woolworths brand), and ensure you use pure icing sugar or a gluten free icing mixture for your topping, as many icing mixtures contain a small amount of wheat flour.

Egg allergy? 

Use Orgran egg replacer and water in place of eggs. Some people use chia or flax eggs ( with ground chia seeds and water ) but the texture of this is often better suited to a muffin recipe with chunky ingredients rather than a smooth cupcake.

Dairy free? 

Use soy milk or rice milk, and a dairy/soy free margarine, like Nuttelex. TIP:  buy a new tub of margarine for the party to avoid any contamination with things like peanut butter or toast crumbs from the family.

And… remember to read all the food labels of your usual ingredients to check for the allergens your guests need to avoid!

In Australia, the 10 most common food allergies are to milk, egg, wheat, soy, peanut, sesame, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, and lupin. The recipe below can me modified to cater for them all if need be.

Bloom allergy friendly birthday cupcakes

-makes 12 large cupcakes

Cake ingredients:

2 cups self raising flour (regular or gluten/wheat free mix)

¾ cup castor sugar

¾ cup milk (or soy or rice milk)

125g melted Nuttelex margarine 

2 eggs (or 2 tsp Orgran egg replacer + 2Tbs water)

2 tsp vanilla essence

Icing:

4 cups pure icing sugar

1 cup Nuttelex

2-3 Tbs milk (or soy or rice milk)

1 tsp vanilla essence

Optional:

Food coloring, or try a more natural colour and flavour like raspberry or strawberry powder or cocoa powder.

Sprinkles, cachous, fresh or dried berries or other favourite decorations (remember to check the ingredients!)

Method:

Preheat oven to 200 degrees C

Line 12 hole muffin pan with paper cupcake cases or reusable silicone ones.

Sift SR flour and castor sugar into a large bowl, and make a well in the centre.

Add eggs/egg replacer, vanilla, your milk choice and melted Nuttelex into the centre and gently stir to combine.

Spoon into cupcake cases, up to about ¾ full, to ensure they don’t rise too high when cooking.

Bake for about 12-15 mins, or until just cooked through.

Cool thoroughly on a wire rack before icing.

Icing:

Beat margarine and vanilla together. Sift in icing sugar, adding in a little of the milk as you go, and your colour/flavour if using. Beat until evenly combined.  Spoon into piping bag and pipe on top cupcakes. Decorate as desired!

Cupcake decorations – Keep in mind any decorations you use may contain things like milk or wheat, so check labels carefully. Major supermarkets tend to carry items like sprinkles and cake confetti that are often suitable, or consider a non edible decoration like a paper topper that matches your party theme.

Remember when cooking for a crowd to be aware of cross contamination in the kitchen. When preparing foods, clean work areas, and use separate chopping boards, utensils and serving plates. Always remember to wash hands between preparing items too.

 ***

The other way to deal with food allergies, which is also totally acceptable, is to admit if you feel unsure or overwhelmed. 

Invite the parents of kids with food allergies to stay at the party to make sure their little one is safely included.  Many parents of children with severe allergies will do this automatically- stay on and keep watch, ask you what ingredients are in a product, or bring along some food of their own, and their medicine bag just in case. 

They wont be offended, they’ll appreciate you take their little one’s allergies as seriously as they do. And you will all have a great time, safely enjoying the celebration together!

Angela @ Bloom


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Milk substitutes are rapidly gaining popularity in the modern food supply. They’re chosen for different reasons by different people  – allergies, intolerances, vegan diets, environmental concerns, and of course health benefits. Do you choose any plant based milks in your family diet?

 

Readily available plant based milks include almond, coconut, soy, oat, rice, as well as couple of other more obscure varieties like cashew, hemp seed and flax seed milks.

Home made milk substitutes are also becoming more popular, with people enjoying knowing where their food is coming from, exactly what goes into it, and the lower level of environment impact from food prepared in the home.

Like with all food selection there are lots of factors that will guide your individual choice, depending on what’s important to you –  things like taste, nutrition, health conditions, availablilty, cost, and environmental sustainability.

I’m all for the availability of dairy milk substitutes. They’ve been a great source of nutrition for many of my clients, and I’ve personally included them in my diet over the last decade since having children with food allergies. Back then the choice available was much smaller, and asking for anything more exotic than a soy latte was unheard of!

These days I actually enjoy a variety of plant based milks in my coffee or with granola for breakfast, but I also drink cow’s milk regularly and eat other milk based products like cheese. Dietary variety is a key factor in meeting nutrient requirements after all!

If you want to make sure your milk choice is helping meet your nutrition needs, there are a few key factors you should look out for.

Energy – This varies widely between the type of milk you are choosing, and is dependant on the amount of fat, carbohydrate (sugar) and protein in each milk. Low energy milks include choices like skim cows milk, rice and almond milk, and higher energy choices include full fat dairy milks, and traditionally produced coconut milk. If you’re choosing you’re milk based on its energy content, look at the nutrition panel and compare brands for their 100ml serving. But don’t just look at energy content, by doing so you may be doing your body out of lots of important nutrients below.

Protein – Again this varies widely between milk sources and brands. Items like rice milk are typically very low in protein, as is the base ingredient of rice, but surprisingly to some people, so are most nut milks, as the protein portion of the nut is mostly thrown away. Cow’s milk tends to be the highest in protein at around 3.5-4g/100ml, and soy milk is typically the highest protein plant based milk, averaging around the same . While calcium fortified soy milk is nutritionally my plant based milk of choice, its important to note that it’s not the right choice for everyone (for example some children are also allergic to soy protein, and some soy milks are not good choices on a low FODMAP diet).

Fat – Full cream cow’s milk is often rejected by people due to its higher saturated fat content when compared to skim and reduced fat choices. However fat is an important source of energy in the diet, and children under 2 years (when not drinking breastmilk or formula) are encouraged to use only full cream milks. Fat also plays a role in satiety, or how full we feel after eating and drinking, so many people prefer to use full cream milk for this reason. Coconut milk for cooking has 16 g/100ml fat, where as coconut milks designed for drinking have less (eg Sanatarium coconut milk 2.1g/100ml), but be aware most of this is saturated fat too. The source of fats in other commercial plant based milks is mostly unsaturated fats, but may also be an added fat like sunflower or canola oil, added for texture and energy content, rather than a naturally occurring fat.

Calcium – Plant based milks like rice, soy, coconut and nut milks are not naturally high in calcium. This means to meet your calcium requirements you will either need to choose a fortified commercial variety, choose enough other sources of dietary calcium, or take a calcium supplement. My personal choice is to choose a calcium fortified variety, and we recommend those that contain at least 120mg Calcium per 100ml.

Sugar – Many ( but not all) commercial plant based milks are sweetened with sugar or sugar alternatives to improve flavour. Lactose is the naturally occurring sugar in cow’s milk (and in human breast milk ), and our body usually produces the lactase enzyme from birth to be able to digest this. If you are lactose intolerant, all plant based milks are suitable, however simply swapping to a lactose free cow’s milk could be your best nutritional choice. If making plant based milks at home, keep in mind that large amounts of added sugars will add extra energy to your diet.

Iodine – Cow’s milk and dairy products are a source of dietary Iodine – an important nutrient for thyroid hormone production – especially in pregnancy and childhood. However, milk is not the high source of iodine it once was, since dairy industry stopped using iodophores to clean milk storage vats in the 1960s, and should not be relied upon as the primary source of iodine in the diet.

Plant based milks however are significantly lower in iodine, and swapping these into your diet will mean you definitely need to look for another source to boost your iodine intake.

The good news is there are other great non dairy sources in the diet like fish, shellfish and seaweed and eggs, which all contain more iodine per 100g than milk. On top of this, commercial bakers in Australia must use iodised salt in bread making, so there is an additional source of iodine readily available. As dietitians we typically advocate for using less salt in the diet, but where salt is used, choose iodised salt (unless you have a medical reason not to do so!).

B12 – Cows milk can be an important source of B12, particularly for vegetarians who don’t eat eggs. Some commercial soy milks are fortified with B12 (like Sanitarium So good Essential). If your are vegetarian, it’s worth reading your food labels to check how you can best meet your needs.

So choose your milk wisely, as it is an important source of nutrition in your day. If cow’s milk is not for you, that’s ok, but it’s not always as easy as a simple swap. If your favourite milk choice is lacking in a certain nutrient, make sure you boost your diet with other foods to cover the gaps. For the best individually tailored dietary advice, see an Accredited Practicing Dietitian, particularly if you or your family have any additional health issues.

 

Angela @ Bloom 🌿

(These tips, and other great nutrition stories, are available in our quarterly nutrition news updates. Subscribe to our nutrition newsletter on our home page to be the first to get it, straight in your inbox!)


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Persistence. The key to combatting toddler fussy eating?

I’ve had lots of people say to me, “You’re lucky your kids are good eaters. It must be easy because you are a dietitian”. Thankfully, my kids do love to eat – now. And I genuinely feel more happy and relaxed at family meal times now with 4 kids at the table than ever before.

But I will be honest – it’s still not “perfect” (is there even such a thing?), and it was a long road to get to where we are.

We haven’t exactly had things easy in the feeding department. All 4 of my kids have had food allergies – 2 still see the Allergist regularly. One had the most sensitive gag reflex as toddler, she would eat an entire meal, vomit then immediately ask to be fed again. And one had a horrible run with enormous tonsils and adenoids, having multiple infections, speech difficulties and feeding aversions before needing speech therapy and surgery.

All of these are minor issues in comparison to the complexities faced by many other families – but they were enough to add stress to an already gorgeously chaotic family life.

So while I haven’t had the easiest run with feeders, I do feel incredibly blessed that our issues were small, that my training allowed me to see what was happening, and that I had the knowledge to know where to get help, and what to do at home.

But as I said, it was a long road to get here, particularly with Mr Tonsils. In all honesty, how we ended up here was not through luck, or my profession, but through sheer persistence.

There were so many times when I wanted to just give him pasta, again, while we ate something else. Times when I picked up food from all over the floor, screaming on the inside, but calmly outwardly saying “Food stays on the table”. Countless times when I lamented the huge waste of food as I throw the veggies in the bin, again.

But it was the persistence with calmly offering without expectation, giving only brief and gentle encouragement, and most importantly, family role modelling that led to where we are today.

Recently, he, the fussiest of my four, finally bit into a cherry tomato (albeit in a effort to squirt his sisters with the insides – but thats how we encouraged him to put it in his mouth) and said “I tasted the juice!”. A few months ago he would’ve pouted “I don’t eat tomatoes, take it off my plate!!!”.

He also ate black charcoal noodles – “Mum, black is my favourite colour”- when they arrived unexpectedly in his beloved ramen noodle soup at a new restaurant. He randomly picked up the broccoli I was preparing for his sisters’ school lunch boxes and said “Mum, I eat this now, I’m strong”. He then proceeded to pop it in his mouth and walk away – the rest of us stunned into jaw dropping silence. He picked up chicken breast of the plate and ate it without a word, after months of not eating it. He drank a green smoothie and called it “hulk juice”, flexing his biceps as he drank.

So, you can safely say we had an amazing week at the dining table that week (cue champagne!), which reminded me that all that persistence with our feeding plan was worth it. We were winning.

I know I’m not alone in this sort of feeding experience. I’ve met so many parents over the years who have faced the same thing. The ongoing trials, but then finally the successes.

This year Julia and I will be putting together a package to help families with their in home feeding issues; so watch this space.

We will share the training and experience we’ve had as Paediatric Dietitians, and the trial by fire we’ve had as parents. We’re aiming to provide families with scientifically sound, but genuinely practical advice.

It works if you work it. We’ve got proof!

 

Find this, and more family eating, health and wellbeing stories in our Bloom quarterly nutrition newsletters. And to subscribe to future updates, click here

Angela @ Bloom 🌿


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We all know buying fruit and vegetables in season makes good sense. Food is fresher, tastes better, and is more economical. But with so many fruits and vegetables available out of their natural season, it can be confusing to know what to buy right now.

Below is a guide to whats available in the southern states in Autumn for March/April/May.

Autumn fruits –
apples, blackberries, cumquats, figs, feijoas, grapes, honeydew, limes, mandarins, valencia oranges,

passionfruits, pears, persimmon, plums, pomegranates, quinces, raspberries, rhubarb, rockmelons, strawberries, watermelons.

Autumn vegetables –
asian greens, beetroot, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, capsicums, carrots, celeriac, celery, cauliflower, eggplant, jerusalem artichoke, kale, kohlrabi, leeks, onions, parsnip, peas, potato, pumpkin, shallots, silverbeet, spinach, swede, sweet corn, turnip, chicory, zucchini.

Nuts –

chestnuts, pistachios.

(Seasonal Guide with thanks to Adelaide Farmer’s Market)

And what to do with these autumn offerings?

While the weather is still warm in the beginning of autumn, fresh foods served simply, like BBQs, salads and shared platters and outdoor eating remain at the top of the family meal list.

As the weather cools down, consider preserving some of the warmer weather’s fruits and veg for the coming winter. Getting chilly? Start ramping up the roast and soup rotations to help meet the family’s 2 & 5 goals for fruit and veg. Leftovers are great for lunchboxes too!

Remember, if you’ve got a fussy eater in the family, providing both new and familiar options of fruits and vegetables in a buffet or family style offering encourages children to try new foods.

Enjoy!

Angela @ Bloom 🌿

 


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It can be tricky to find a recipe for a lunchbox cookie that meets the brief; a good source of nutrients, enough protein and fibre to keep the kids full, not too much sugar, no nuts, and tasty enough that they actually eat them!

 

I’ve tried many a cookie recipe, and played around with a few favourites to come up with one that all 6 members of our family really enjoy. After posting some pics on instagram, we were asked by people to share the recipe… so here it is.

 

It’s definitely not your traditional choc chip cookie, and may not be sweet enough for some, so check out the notes at the bottom of the recipe for modification tips if needed.

 

Chia sunflower double choc cookies (Dairy free)

Ingredients

100g Nuttelex olive oil light, melted and cooled

1/4 c maple syrup or honey

1 egg

2 tsp natural vanilla essence

 

1/2 c ground sunflower seeds

1/2 c wholemeal self raising flour

1 1/2 c quick oats

1/4 c cocoa powder or cacao

1/2 tsp bicarbonate soda

2 tsp mixed chia seeds

 

1/3 c dark choc chips ( I use Callebaut Belgian Callets from Costco, and they are dairy free)

 

Method

Mix all wet ingredients together (cooled melted nuttelex, maple syrup, egg and vanilla essence) until combined.

Stir together all the remaining dry ingredients, except for the choc chips) removing any lumps.

Fold wet ingredients into dry ingredients until combined. The final consistency shouldn’t be too wet. (If it is, scatter through some more oats)  Then fold through choc chips.

Roll into balls, and place on tray with 5 cm space between, and press lightly to form a cookie shape.

Bake at 180 deg for 15-18 mins, or until cooked to your liking.
(15 min is perfect for my oven which runs quite hot)

Cool on a rack and store in an airtight container.

 

NOTES

They may soften and become more like a whoopee pie consistency if not all eaten on the first day, but my kids really like them either way.

These cookies are on the more savory side of a sweet cookie! If your kids prefer a sweeter cookie you may need to start with more maple syrup, or add a little brown sugar, and gradually decrease the amount of sweetness. Or use a few extra choc chips 😉 .

You can also make them egg free if you need to for allergies or vegan diets, by simply omitting the egg, but decrease the oats to about 1 cup, otherwise the mixture will be too dry.
My best advice is to have a play around and see how they work best for your tribe… the cookies you get to taste test along the way are all in the name of science 🙂
x Angela @ Bloom 🌿

 

 

 


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Here at Bloom we really love summer. So the arrival of autumn can bring mixed feelings.

It can be hard to farewell our gorgeous Aussie summer, as the days start to cool down, and mornings are a little darker.  But, there is still much Vitamin D to be gained from long afternoons in the mild March sunshine, little ones begin sleeping in again, finally, and the gorgeous autumn fruit and vegetable produce begins popping up in markets, grocers, and supermarkets everywhere. Actually, when you think about it, autumn is pretty darn good.

So here’s our autumn gift to you 💛.

Click the mini-mag link below ⤵, to get our collection of seasonal nutrition tidbits for you and your family. Fussy eater? Needing fitness inspo? Family dinner recipes? We’ve got you covered.

We hope you enjoy it!

Angela @ Bloom 🌿

Bloom Autumn 18 Nutrition News


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Summer brings what many believe to be the best fruit and vegetables to Australian family tables. Here at Bloom, we agree!

Think fresh tropical and stone fruits livening up meals, and little hand holding huge chunks of watermelon at snack times… Firm favourites for adults and children alike!

Check out this guide to what great fruits and vegetables are in season now and popping up here in South Australia, and think how you could make these shine at your family table to hit your 2 & 5 targets.

Fruit:

Apricots
Bananas
Blackberries
Blueberries
Carambola/starfruit
Cherries
Grapes
Honeydew melons
Lemons
Lychees
Mangoes
Nectarines
Peaches
Passionfruit
Pineapples
Rockmelon/cantaloupe
Rambutan
Raspberries
Red papaya
Strawberries
Valencia oranges
Watermelon
Yellow papaw

Vegetables:

Asparagus
Capsicum
Celery
Cucumber
Eggplants
Green beans
Hass avocados
Lettuce
Peas
Radish
Snow peas
Spring onions/green shallots
Sugar snap peas
Sweet corn
Zucchini

(I downloaded this list long ago to help guide my own family’s seasonal fruit and vegetable shopping, and I’ve long since lost the source! But I hope it helps steer your family into eating more fresh seasonal fruit and veggies, just like it did mine!)

Enjoy some of your family favourites, and try out something new this week,

Angela @ Bloom 🌿


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We. Love. Summer!

Here at Bloom we do, really, love summer.

And we happily welcome the arrival of the warmer weather, school holidays, Aussie Christmas, and the Bloom Nutrition Studio seasonal newsletter Summer 17/18 edition!

Click the mini-mag link below ⤵️, to get our collection of summer nutrition tidbits for you and your family.

Eat well, live well and enjoy your summer 💛 !

Angela @ Bloom 🌿

 

 

 

 


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I don’t know about you, but I can’t get enough of cauliflower at the moment!
It seems to be the new “it” food, and whilst we’re not into the whole concept of superfoods here at Bloom Nutrition (all fruit and veggies are good for you, it’s aiming for 2 & 5 that really needs to be our focus) I do enjoy seeing all the new ideas people come up with for cooking and serving a veg once it becomes popular.
One of my favourite ways to eat cauliflower is in a salad. If you read my blog post on lunch ideas (here), you’ll know I like to prepare a base that I can then pull into a salad on the day. With this recipe I prep the cauliflower, pearl barley and dressing at the beginning of the week and simply layer it and add the baby spinach come lunchtime.
I hope you enjoy this as much as I do!

Julia @ Bloom 🌿 x

 

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER SALAD

Makes 4 serves

Ingredients

1 whole cauliflower cut into florets
Olive Oil – 2 Tablespoons

1 cup of pearl barley – cooked as per instructions on packet

Spice Mix:

1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (more if you like it spicy!)
1 Tablespoon Tumeric

 

Dressing:

200g natural yoghurt
1 tablespoon dijion mustard
zest and juice of 1/2 lemon

To assemble:

1 bag of baby spinach
Pepitas

 

Directions:

Roughly chop your cauliflower into florets. Toss first in olive oil then in the spice mix. Lay on to a baking tray and cook for about 20mins at 180 degrees or until a skewer will pass through easily.
Remove from oven and allow to cool.
Whilst cauliflower is baking, cook pearl barley according to instructions on packet.
Mix together ingredients for dressing.

To assemble, add about a cup of baby spinach to your bowl. Layer with 1/2 cup of cooked barley and scatter with a 1/4 of the cauliflower florets. Dollop around dressing and sprinkle with a few peptias.

Enjoy!