Family meals

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Hello there!

 

Well, this year hasn’t turned out exactly as planned has it?! But spring has arrived and there is promise of all things fresh and new.

Take a look inside our 2020 spring seasonal nutrition newsletter, here, for a little extra information and inspiration to get your family’s nutrition on track for the season.

 

Hoping you and your family are well, fit and happy,

x Bloom

 

 


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Welcome to Autumn.

Inside this season’s bloom nutrition studio newsletter are our top tips for boosting your family’s health with plant power!

The Mediterranean diet, nuts for health, top tips for lunch boxes, a great chickpea burger recipe and more!

So sit back and take a look, here! We hope it brings lots of plant based inspiration to your family table this season!

 

Angela @ Bloom

 


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Hello Summer and (almost) Hello Christmas!

 

Who else is ready for the Christmas break?! Here at Bloom Nutrition Studio we most definitely are! So we’ve put together a little selection of our favourite tips and tricks for coming out on top during our hot Aussie Christmas season. Click here to read!

 

We hope you enjoy it, and most of all, we hope you have a safe, happy and healthy festive season!

x Angela @ Bloom


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You’ve heard it before – it’s famed as the most important meal of the day. But why is breakfast so good?

Breakfast, literally, breaks the fast from overnight, fuelling your body with energy and nutrients for the day ahead. So, breakfast is like the platform you use to dive into the day. Start the day right and the day ahead is looking good from the get-go!

In nutrition research, eating breakfast is linked to many good things. There’s an association between eating breakfast and maintaining a healthy weight, as well as increased overall nutrient intakes for key nutrients like fibre, calcium, iron, folate and vitamin C. Research suggests skipping breakfast impairs cognitive performance (so little brains don’t work as well!) , and there are associations between skipping breakfast and an increased risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Back in 2014, an Australian Bureau of Statistics Census at School Survey found that as many as 1 in 7 kids weren’t eating breakfast on a given day. And similar numbers of adults were found to skip breaky back in the 2013 Australian Health Survey, and 2012 National Nutrition Survey. So if this is a common occurrence in your house, it’s time to take action!

Set aside even as little as 5-10 extra minutes in the morning routine to sit and eat.  And given that breakfast is one-third of our main meals, it makes sense to make it count nutritionally.

Breakfasts higher in protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals, and lower in free sugars are the way to go.

How do we do this? It’s as simple as choosing minimally processed foods, (like food from the major groups of the Australian Guide to Healthy eating, or AGHE, below), and getting your kids on board with the choices! When kids have some input and ownership of the meals that are chosen for the family, they’re more likely to eat them.

When talking to kids I love using the analogy of foods that make you GO, GROW and GLOW.

GO foods are the grains or carbohydrate sources – the yellow area from the AGHE. They provide energy, fibre and if you’re choosing whole grains, lots of metabolism-boosting B vitamins.

GROW foods are what you might typically think as the protein sources – meat, eggs, nuts, dairy – giving protein and essential nutrients like iron, calcium, phosphorous, zinc – important for building muscles and bones. These are the blue and purple sections of the AGHE.

GLOW foods are those foods that help your body feel great – they’re from green sections of the AGHE. Filled with fruits and vegetables, they’re packed with all the good stuff –  fibre, prebiotics, and a whole host of vitamins and minerals.

So a breaky that ticks all 3 big GO, GROW and GLOW boxes is a great start.

How do we achieve this? Try some of the easy ideas below:

·     A smoothie (milk, yoghurt and fresh fruit) & a slice or two of grainy toast with your favourite topping

·     Grainy granola, with oats, dried fruit, nuts, seeds, served with milk or yoghurt

·     A breakfast wrap – multigrain wrap, filled with scrambled eggs, tomato and spinach

·     A jaffle, made with wholemeal bread, filled with baked beans and cheese

·     Good old fashioned porridge oats made with milk, and topped with banana and cinnamon

·     Rye sourdough with tomato, avocado and crumbled feta

The list goes on!

So give your family breakfast the once over. Look at what you’re regularly serving, and where you might have gaps. Pop in something from the food group that’s missing to give your breaky a nutrient boost and supercharge your day!

 


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It’s that time again… With the change of seasons comes a new Bloom Nutrition Studio seasonal nutrition newsletter. Hurrah!

 

This Autumn we’re sharing our top tips to start the day right, with our gorgeous new Breakfast Issue.

 

Planning better breakfasts, breakfast in a hurry, long and lazy weekend breakfasts, and some awesome new recipes await inside.

 

Sit back, relax, and have a read. We hope it brings lots of delicious, nutritious inspiration to your family breakfast table.

 

x Angela @ Bloom  🌿


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Busy lives call for time savers. There’s no doubt about it.

But taking short cuts need not mean missing out on fuelling your family with the good stuff!

A few sneaky strategies can help you get ahead with your families nutrition, so you don’t feel like you are falling behind when the business of life gets in the way!

COOK ONCE – EAT TWICE

It can be hard to get into the kitchen with enough time to make a full meal every night – so don’t! Call on those meal items that can be made into a dinner on multiple nights of the week! Quickly store extras safely in the fridge if you plan to use them in the next night or two, or tuck them away into the freezer to defrost for a later date.

Roasting a chicken? Pop in 2 or 3! Left overs are perfect for chicken noodle salad, noodle soup, chicken salad wraps, pulled chicken tacos, chicken and vegetable fried rice…. the list goes on!

Like salmon? Rather than panfrying a few fillets for dinner, think about oven baking a whole side of salmon. Leftovers can be used in things like homemade sushi, soba noodle and asian vegetable salad, in a rice poke bowl, added to a pasta with pesto and peas, or with a quick slaw to to top jacket potatoes.

Got a great recipe for bolognese or a veg pumped napolitana sauce? Grab your biggest pot and make a double or triple quantity. Use it for meals like lasagne, scrolls, mini pizzas, pasta, even a quick jaffle! Check out Julia’s great vegetarian lasagne on page 10  of our Summer Nutrition Newsletter for inspiration.

SPEEDY SUPPERS

Don’t forget it’s totally ok to go pre-prepared when you are short on time. And not every dinner needs to be a gastronomic affair!

There are lots of nutritious quick options available these days. Aim for items that are minimally processed, and big on real, fresh ingredients. Check the nutrition panel for the ingredient list, and to watch the salt, fat and sugar content too.

If you know your week ahead includes some busy or late nights, think about adding these to your shopping trolley…

Proteins: Canned tuna, smoked salmon, frozen marinated chicken breasts or fish fillets, hummus dip or canned legumes of your choice!

Grains: Microwave rice and quinoa, flat breads, pizza bases, whole sourdough loaves, quick cook fresh pasta.

Veg: No prep veg like avocados, mini cucumbers, cherry tomatoes and baby spinach, pre-made salad bags, pre-cut roasting veggies, antipasto vegetable mix, or even pre-made fresh vegetable soups. Don’t forget frozen veggies like edamame, chopped spinach or kale that can be quickly heated and added to your speedy meal… anything you like to get you to your 2&5!

x Angela


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Like most dietitians I don’t like the word “diet”. It makes me think of a whole lot of “rules” that need to be followed and adhered to, and for the most part take the fun out of eating. Now of course for some people, needing a “diet” is a necessary part of life. As a dietitian, I’ve helped many people with low FODMAP, gluten free, low potassium, high energy etc diets, and when required these diets can deliver huge health benefits. Because my job involves advising people on “diets” many people often question me as to my own diet. Do I follow something in particular? People often assume I’m highly restrictive with my choices, when that couldn’t be further from the truth. I love food and (mostly) enjoy cooking. I also enjoy looking for new ways to make healthy foods tasty and easy to prepare. 

I strongly believe in the concept of mindful or intuitive eating and definitely have a “non diet’ approach to health. I do believe that our bodies are equipped with everything we need to maintain a healthy weight, this is our appetite. For some people this might be slightly heavier and for others slightly lighter, there’s no denying that we all come in different shapes and sizes. In our fast paced society many of us have lost the ability to tune into our appetite. We eat because the food is there, because it’s 12noon and that ’s when we take our lunch break (whether we’re hungry or not), we eat too fast, we eat because we are tired/stressed/emotional or even happy. Over time we stop listening to our bodies. 

What I do try to follow is our Australian Guidelines to Healthy Eating and my diet is probably most closely aligned to the Mediterranean way of eating. I also try to focus on what I should be eating not on what I shouldn’t be. This means I’ve always got some sort of plan for how I’m going to get my 5 serves of veggies and 2 serves of fruit in each day. I also try to tick off my 3 serves of dairy and will look for opportunities to add nuts and seeds (for the heart healthy omega 3 fatty acids they deliver) to my meals and snacks, as well as other quality proteins. When I choose grains with my meals, I make sure they’re wholegrain and low GI as much as possible. I find that by focussing on eating all the foods my body needs for health each day, I actually have little appetite left for snack foods or more indulgent choices. Now don’t get me wrong, I enjoy my chocolate, cakes ice cream and a glass of wine as much as the next person, and if a truly feel like having them I do. I don’t restrict any food but I listen to my body and I set aside the time to eat. Eating when you’re distracted scrolling through Facebook, driving in the car or even reading a magazine can often mean your not tuning into your natural appetite. In fact if you’re eating like this you can often get to the end of the meal and not really feel like you’ve eaten because you haven’t stopped to enjoy the flavours and textures of the food. 

So here’s what a dietitian eats in a day!

Breakfast: I’m very seasonal with my breakfast, when the weather is cold I always start the day by making a huge pot of porridge (rolled oats) for my whole family. For myself I top it with brown sugar, chia seeds, cinnamon and walnuts. Most days I have 1/2 glass of unsweetened orange juice and a small (piccolo size) white coffee. In warmer weather bircher muesli or toasted muesli with Jalna sweet and creamy yoghurt and fruit does the trick.

Mid morning: Often I find a coffee is  enough for my morning snack. It’s always a skinny latte but this time it’s a larger size (medium if I’m out and about) and about 200ml if I’m home. On this particular day I was hungry for a snack as well so I had some multigrain crackers and hummus. Other choices would be one of my coco cranberry bliss balls. 

Lunch:

I’m always looking to get a lot of vegetables in at lunch so I don’t have to fit them all in at dinner. It also helps keep me full all day. This week I made a huge batch of these spiralised sweet potato noodles sautéed in chilli, olive oil and lemon zest and teamed it with crunchy oven baked kale and a sprinkling of pine nuts. 

I usually team my lunch with a green smoothie or I have a fruit salad with Jalna sweet and creamy yoghurt and a sprinkling of toasted muesli. 

Mid afternoon: I’m not usually hungry, sometimes I have a peppermint tea. Occasionally I join my kids in their after school snack, but the key here is I listen to my body and eat if I’m hungry.

D; My dinners are planned for the whole week to minimise the stress of having to come up with things on the fly (and then not having the right ingredients). I divide the week up between meals I know my kids like, meals I like to eat and new things we want to try. I always aim to have at least 1 vegetarian meal and 1 fish meal (I should really be eating more fish, 2 would be ideal) and 2-3 red meat meals. Lots of our meals are served family style where everyone can help themselves to what they like. This helps give the kids some control and choice at the dinner table, and has been shown to help minimise fussy eating in the the long run. Our meal tonight was chicken drumsticks cooked in the oven, salad, kale chips and bread. No matter what type of meal I’m cooking, I aways make sure that there are plenty of vegetables (even if my kids don’t always chose them!). 

D: Now as I said earlier I don’t believe in restricting any food. Research has shown that the more we try and restrict foods that we think are “bad for us” the more we crave them and can often end up overeating them. With that in mind, if I feel like having a “treat” I go for it. This particular night I had a chocolate covered ice cream on a stick (connoisseur).

With regards to alcohol I really try to minimise my intake. New research published in the Lancet this year has suggested that our current guidelines advocate for too much alcohol. It’s been suggested that men and women should have no more than 100g of alcohol per week, or 6 standard drinks (a standard drink being just 100ml of wine). Our Australian guidelines are currently under review and will be released next year. Given the association between alcohol intake and some types of cancer, (and because I come from a family with a high risk of breast cancer), I try to restrict my intake to a standard glass of wine and I make sure I have at least 2 alcohol free days a week. 

So there you go I follow a diet that is flexible, nourishing and above all enjoyable. Whilst i eat for health I also eat for enjoyment and that’s something I truly want to teach my children. I believe that that teaching your children about healthy eating starts with respecting that your child has their own programmed appetite and they intuitively know how much they need to eat each day. 

Fascinating research has been conducted on infants that shows how beautifully programmed an child’s appetite can be. Very young infants were fed baby formula  made up to different calorie strengths. Guess what happened? When the babies were fed the energy dense formula they drank less, and when they were fed the more dilute formula they drank more! In other words their appetite kicked in and they ate (drank) according to their needs. How amazing is that? 

Other research has shown however, that by age 4yrs many children are learning to ignore their natural appetite and already display signs of what we call “non hungry” eating. 

So how can be help our children become intuitive eaters?

My top tips are:

  1. Recognise that your child has their own appetite and respect that. Don’t ask them to clear their plate or eat a certain number of mouthfuls
  2. Don’t rush your children to eat. Set aside the time to sit down at a table and enjoy your meal in peace without distractions (ie tv, books toys etc..)
  3. Don’t label foods as “good” or “bad” – this starts to attach feelings of guilt to food. Teach your children that there are foods that we need to eat all the time and some foods that we don’t need to eat as regularly
  4. Don’t be overly restrictive with food – As parents we want the best for our children and it can be tempting to remove all chocolate, lollies, cake, etc.. from their diets. But do you know what? This approach doesn’t teach your child how to manage these foods or where they fit in a healthy diet. Research has shown that overly restrictive behaviour around food leads to “cravings” for these foods, which ultimately can lead us to over consuming them. I would prefer my children grow up knowing they can enjoy some chocolate but also being able to stop when they’ve had enough of it. It’s important to recognise that food has non nutritional benefits, sometimes we just want to eat something that tastes utterly delicious. I believe children should have this experience. 
  5. Review the messages you send your children about body image and food – What do your children hear you say about your own body? If you are constantly talking about needing to loose weight or what foods you are avoiding, your children will get the message that food is something that they need to be conscious of controlling with external measures rather than something that should be entirely intuitive.

Julia @ Bloom

 

( ps if you want to read more on my thoughts about how I feed my children and teach them about food you might like this blog post)


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We’ve just returned from a short family holiday and it’s had me thinking a lot about food. I can’t tell you how many times people have said to me “ohhh you’re a dietitian, I bet your kids eat well!”. 

Well yes and no. If you saw me on holiday I’d suspect that dietitian wouldn’t be the first thing that sprung to mind. That’s because on holidays I’m completely happy to live in the moment and enjoy plenty of occasional food. After all, that’s the very definition of occasional food..it’s eaten occasionally, and that’s what holidays are. 

Food isn’t just about nutrition. Food can also act as a wonderful memory. Cast your mind back to your own childhood and I’ve got no doubt that you can instantly identify both positive and negative memories that you have of food. Perhaps your nana made a particularly good chocolate cake and now every time you eat cake you think of her? Maybe you made pancakes on the weekends and they are now symbolic of family time for you? Did you have a particular food that you shared with your family at Christmas? 

Rituals represent an important part of family life that bring happiness to children’s lives and give them something to look forward to. Many rituals in family life revolve around food and the benefits that come with this have nothing to do with nutrition.

So back to my holiday, let me tell you what we ate. For my children the day started with either cocopops or nutrigrain, two cereals that would generally NEVER make their way near my pantry. But do you know why I do this? Because it’s a ritual my husband had as a child. He has fond memories of this and therefore it’s something he wanted to repeat with his own children. My kids have to agree on what two choices of cereal they want and when it’s gone, that’s it. My kids don’t ask for these foods outside of holidays because they know it’s simply not what we do. 

Beyond breakfast there was generally no planning and we ate as saw fit in the moment. Our five days away certainly weren’t balanced and we definitely didn’t eat enough vegetables. Will it kill us? Absolutely not. One of the most important things to remember about diet, is that it’s your overall pattern that matters, i.e. what you are doing most of the time.

Some of the biggest studies that have been conducted looking into which diets are best for cancer prevention and heart health such as the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) or Women’s Health Study (A large prospective study looking at risk factors that predispose women to heart disease), look at say fruit and vegetable intake over a prolonged period of time, and then break it down into groups with the highest and lowest intakes. What we see in these studies is that those people in the highest groups of intake have significantly lower rates of disease (eg heart disease or specific types of cancer).  If you monitor your diet and try to get your 2 serves of fruit, 5 serves of vegetables, preference wholegrains and a moderate intake of lean meat and dairy, you are doing a really good job and the occasional ice cream, cheese platter or cake won’t really make any difference. 

Some people might argue that I’m putting these foods on a pedestal, but I disagree and feel that I am simply reminding my children that some foods are only occasional. I could pretend that many of these processed, high sugar, low nutrient foods don’t exist or I could prohibit my children from consuming them. But do you know what? Research has actually shown that the stricter you are with your child’s (or your own) diet, the more they (or you) are likely to binge on these occasional or “junk foods” when they have access to them. I’m a realist, these processed foods exist, and I don’t see them leaving our supermarket shelves anytime soon. I know my children will be introduced to all of these foods eventually, so I might as well do it in a manner that pleases me, and truly teaches them that occasional foods are just that. I also spend time teaching them what good nutrition looks like and how to cook. Learning where processed “occassional” foods fit into your diet is just as big a life skill as learning what good nutrition is and how to cook! 

So this holiday season quite worrying about your diet! Eat mindfully and enjoy the food you are eating with your family. The ice cream won’t kill you, but the memory your kids have of that time Mum and Dad let us eat 2 ice creams in one day, will last a lifetime.  

 

Julia @ Bloom


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Feel that sunshine on your skin!

 

Spring has arrived. The sun is in the sky and the trees are in bloom. Sit back and enjoy our Spring Nutrition Newsletter, with lots of great nutrition news, recipes and family eating tips for the season.

 

We break down getting kids into the kitchen, the new American Academy of Paediatrics statement on additives and child health and what it means for food storage, vegan diets for children, and a host of nutrition tips and recipes.

 

Take a look inside!

 

Cheers,

Click here!

x Bloom 🌿


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Pesto is a firm favourite in our house, and over the years we’ve made many different versions. On current rotation is this delicious nut free recipe.

Most Australian schools are nut free zones to help safely manage nut allergies. This means traditional pestos are off the menu, as they usually include cashews, almonds or pine nuts. While not technically a nut, pine nuts are the kernels or seeds of the pine tree harvested from inside the cones, and are grouped in with the tree nut family. Sunflower seeds, however, are not grouped in the tree nut family and can be substituted easily into a home made pesto, making this a perfect lunchbox filler.

 

Ingredients:
50g sunflower seeds
50ml extra virgin olive oil
50g parmesan cheese, finely grated
1/2 clove fresh garlic, finely grated
2 bunches or basil, leaves picked (equal to about 2 heaped cups of basil leaves)
a squeeze of fresh lemon juice & a pinch of salt

Method: Simply whizz ingredients together in a food processor. Transfer into a clean glass jar, and pour a little extra olive oil over the top to keep it fresh. Store in the fridge and use within a few days, or store in the freezer, in ice cube drays and defrost as needed.

Serve: We love this pesto spread on sourdough bread or wholemeal crackers, stirred through cooked green veggies, mixed through pasta or on top of a pizza base. YUM!


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I’m starving” is a fairly familiar line uttered by children at the end of each school day. Consuming lunch up to three hours before pick-up, they no doubt are hungry. But how often do you provide an after-school snack only to find the munchkins won’t not eat dinner then ask for another snack again before bed? Frustrating isn’t it?

Most children aged under five need to eat every two to three hours. For older children, every three to four hours is sufficient. All children are born with the ability to regulate their appetite. They eat when they’re hungry and stop when full. 

Spacing meals and snacks helps children respond to their appetite. If children are allowed to graze all day, they are never really hungry – or full. Over time, this can erode a child’s natural ability to tune into their appetite, leading to issues in maintaining a healthy weight.  

If you’re offering a snack after school, consider when you are planning to serve dinner. If your children are returning home at 4pm and dinner is planned for 5pm, there’s little chance they are going to be hungry enough to participate. Two hours later at bed time, they’re certainly going to be asking for a snack again. 

Planning the timing of meals and snacks ensures children sit at the table hungry and ready to eat. No one routine will suit every family. For some, serving an early dinner at 4.30pm will be the most successful way to ensure children are not over tired and able to successfully participate in the meal. For others, providing a healthy filling snack after school then serving a later dinner will work well. 

Learning to eat a healthy, balanced diet comes from role modelling. Try to plan a dinner time routine when at least one parent can eat with the children, most of the time.

As we all know, children have a tendency to be fussy. In my experience, snacks can play a large role in contributing to finicky eaters. Because snacks are often considered as something to eat quickly on the go, I find many children are eating nutritionally empty snacks, such as crackers, chips and packets of sweet biscuits. Poor planning is often the culprit. Because children have small appetites and are prone to fussiness, you really need to think of every occasion they eat as an opportunity to offer good nutrition. 

If providing an after-school snack works for your family routine, my top tip is to have planned snacks ready. Once the youngsters are helping themselves, you’ll find they invariably choose foods you don’t want them to eat and portion sizes can get out of control. An after-school snack should not fill them up completely but take the edge off their hunger so they maintain a healthy appetite at dinner. 

My top suggestions for after-school snacks that focus on the core food groups and deliver plenty of nutrition include:

Smoothies – Ideally, try to incorporate a vegetable (eg, a green smoothie – my family’s favourite includes frozen mango, baby spinach, 1 green apple, water and ice) but fruit-based smoothies are good (frozen strawberries, strawberry yoghurt, water and ice is always a hit).

Kale chips – I’ve never seen my kids devour more greens then when I make a batch of these. Simply tear the kale leaves from the stingy vein that runs through it, toss with a small amount of extra virgin olive oil and a little salt and spread evenly over a baking sheet. Don’t over crowd the tray or the kale won’t crisp. Cook at 120 degrees Celsius for 20 to 25 minutes. 

Grazing plate – Focus on your core food groups. I routinely offer wholegrain crackers, nuts, carrot, celery or cucumber sticks, nori sheets, cut up fruit and maybe a dip.  Many children don’t get offered nuts since schools are generally nut free. Nuts are high in essential fatty acids so remembering to offer them outside school is a must.

Still complaining they’re hungry? Remind them dinner is on it’s way and if the complaints continue, offer cut up vegetables, such as carrot, celery etc.

If you’ve stuck to your routine and your children are still demanding a snack before bed, ask yourself whether they truly ate well at dinner? If yes, offer a healthy snack. Nine times out of ten, I find that older children are asking for a snack because they haven’t eaten well at dinner. If you suspect this is going on, it’s ok to hold onto your child’s dinner until bed time. When they tell you they’re hungry, offer to heat it up again.

If you need more advice on fussy eating head here.

Julia x



We all have those days when we arrive home late. It’s dinner time, nothing is prepared, and everyone is hungry. So what’s for dinner?

As dietitians and parents we know every single meal we eat does not need to be perfect; that it’s our overall, long term dietary habits that keep us healthy. But when life is at its busiest and most chaotic, it is great to use as many opportunities as we can to eat well, and nourish our families.

What are your last minute meals based around pantry and freezer staples, with a little inspiration from the fridge for good measure?

Pasta is a great quick meal. It sometimes gets a bad rap, but choose a protein boosted, wholemeal or high fibre variety, keep your portion size in check, and boost with added protein foods and vegetables, and you have a great last minute meal on your hands.  So with just a few minutes extra, you can easily branch out from plain pasta with red sauce and cheese… here are three of our favourites to try.

Dried cheese tortellini (e.g. Barilla) + bought basil & almond pesto + 5 portions of chopped frozen spinach + pecorino. Boil pasta. Heat spinach until cooked through. Stir pesto through spinach, then toss through cooked drained pasta, top with grated pecorino. We serve with: steamed broccoli or green beans…  or whatever veg you have on hand!

Pulse pasta (like San Remo or Eat Banza) + tinned chickpeas + your favourite spice mix + left over roast veggies (we like pumpkin, garlic, broccoli) + chorizo + basil flavoured olive oil. Boil pulse pasta. Pan fry drained tinned chickpeas in a mild spice mix until just dried out. Pan fry diced chorizo. Heat left over roast veggies. Stir through together with a little basil oil to combine.

Your favourite pasta + passata + tinned tuna + frozen broadbeans + garlic + olive oil + parmesan. Boil pasta. Saute garlic in olive oil. Add passata, shelled broadbeans, tuna and 1/2 c grated parmesan and simmer. Toss through cooked pasta ( and add chilli and lemon zest for the grown ups!)

x Angela