Nutrition in the media

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There have been rumblings of concern for a while now about the safety of plastics and food chemicals and many consumers would have no doubt noticed the trend towards “Bisphenol A (BPA)” free plastic products.

The American Academy of Paediatrics (AAP) recently released their “Food Additives and Child Health” Policy Statement, which for the first time makes recommendations about how we store and chose food products that we feed our family.

The AAP have classed food chemicals of concern as those either added directly to our food supply (specifically the preservatives nitrates/nitrites and some food colourings) or those which enter our food via indirect contact from packaging or the processing of food (BPA, phthalates, perfluroalkyls (PFCs), and perchlorates).

BPA (used to stiffen and harden plastic products) and phthalates (used in soft plastic products such as clear plastic food wrap) can both potentially  interfere with the metabolism of carbohydrate and fat and have anti-androgenic effects. There is therefore concern that both chemicals could have a role to play in obesity as well as reproductive development. PFCS and perchlorates can interfere with the production of thyroid hormones, and nitrate and nitrate preservatives have been linked to the production of cancer causing compounds. Some artificial food colourings have been linked to hyperactive and aggressive behaviour.

It’s important to note that much of the studies done to date are animal based studies or epidemiological studies which don’t necessarily point to a “cause and effect” in humans. Within the scientific community there is still a lot of contention as to how much of these chemicals humans are exposed to, and what level of exposure is harmful. Nonetheless, with children being exposed to proportionally more of these chemicals than adults, the AAP feels its prudent to start reducing our exposure. 

The AAP have made the following recommendations:

  • Where possible choose fresh fruits and vegetables and wash those that cannot be peeled
  • Avoid canned foods as these can be lined with BPA (note: there are some BPA free canned products in Australia)
  • Avoid plastic storage containers in favour of glass or stainless steel 
  • Purchase PBA and phthalate free products (note: In Australia we have many BPA  free plastic options. BPA has been replaced with other chemicals about which little is known. Because of this it might be a better option to avoid plastics altogether where possible, although there is no evidence to support this)
  • Avoid clear plastic wraps (Phthalates) and baking paper (PFCS)
  • Avoid Microwaving food and beverages (including breastmilk and formula) (heat causes the chemicals to leach out from plastic)
  • Avoid putting plastic products in the dishwasher, hand wash them
  • Limit or avoid processed meats (nitrate and nitrate preservatives are used in small goods such as ham and bacon)
  • Limit processed foods 
  • Avoid artificial food colourings

Whilst there are certainly things we can do everyday at home to reduce our exposure to these chemicals, the reality is that it will take a “whole of food supply” approach to truly remove these chemicals from our environment. Sure, you can decant your dry goods into glass jars or buy your grocery items in bulk or from markets, however, many of these products were probably stored or transported in plastic prior to being placed into barrels or boxes at your point of purchase. 

In the meantime I’ve taken baby steps at home to start reducing my family’s exposure. For a while now I’ve been using glass storage containers in my pantry (there’s the added bonus that they look nice), I hand wash my lunch boxes each day (these are BPA free), and the lunch boxes I pack are generally free of plastic wrap and packaging (bento style boxes are a great option to help you do this). 

If you’d like to read more about this topic head to:

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2018/07/19/peds.2018-1408

https://www.pehsu.net/_Phthalates_and_Bisphenol_A_Advisory.htmlhttp://www.foodstandards.gov.au/consumer/chemicals/bpa/Pages/default.aspx

 

Julia @ Bloom


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Feel that sunshine on your skin!

 

Spring has arrived. The sun is in the sky and the trees are in bloom. Sit back and enjoy our Spring Nutrition Newsletter, with lots of great nutrition news, recipes and family eating tips for the season.

 

We break down getting kids into the kitchen, the new American Academy of Paediatrics statement on additives and child health and what it means for food storage, vegan diets for children, and a host of nutrition tips and recipes.

 

Take a look inside!

 

Cheers,

Click here!

x Bloom 🌿


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Milk substitutes are rapidly gaining popularity in the modern food supply. They’re chosen for different reasons by different people  – allergies, intolerances, vegan diets, environmental concerns, and of course health benefits. Do you choose any plant based milks in your family diet?

 

Readily available plant based milks include almond, coconut, soy, oat, rice, as well as couple of other more obscure varieties like cashew, hemp seed and flax seed milks.

Home made milk substitutes are also becoming more popular, with people enjoying knowing where their food is coming from, exactly what goes into it, and the lower level of environment impact from food prepared in the home.

Like with all food selection there are lots of factors that will guide your individual choice, depending on what’s important to you –  things like taste, nutrition, health conditions, availablilty, cost, and environmental sustainability.

I’m all for the availability of dairy milk substitutes. They’ve been a great source of nutrition for many of my clients, and I’ve personally included them in my diet over the last decade since having children with food allergies. Back then the choice available was much smaller, and asking for anything more exotic than a soy latte was unheard of!

These days I actually enjoy a variety of plant based milks in my coffee or with granola for breakfast, but I also drink cow’s milk regularly and eat other milk based products like cheese. Dietary variety is a key factor in meeting nutrient requirements after all!

If you want to make sure your milk choice is helping meet your nutrition needs, there are a few key factors you should look out for.

Energy – This varies widely between the type of milk you are choosing, and is dependant on the amount of fat, carbohydrate (sugar) and protein in each milk. Low energy milks include choices like skim cows milk, rice and almond milk, and higher energy choices include full fat dairy milks, and traditionally produced coconut milk. If you’re choosing you’re milk based on its energy content, look at the nutrition panel and compare brands for their 100ml serving. But don’t just look at energy content, by doing so you may be doing your body out of lots of important nutrients below.

Protein – Again this varies widely between milk sources and brands. Items like rice milk are typically very low in protein, as is the base ingredient of rice, but surprisingly to some people, so are most nut milks, as the protein portion of the nut is mostly thrown away. Cow’s milk tends to be the highest in protein at around 3.5-4g/100ml, and soy milk is typically the highest protein plant based milk, averaging around the same . While calcium fortified soy milk is nutritionally my plant based milk of choice, its important to note that it’s not the right choice for everyone (for example some children are also allergic to soy protein, and some soy milks are not good choices on a low FODMAP diet).

Fat – Full cream cow’s milk is often rejected by people due to its higher saturated fat content when compared to skim and reduced fat choices. However fat is an important source of energy in the diet, and children under 2 years (when not drinking breastmilk or formula) are encouraged to use only full cream milks. Fat also plays a role in satiety, or how full we feel after eating and drinking, so many people prefer to use full cream milk for this reason. Coconut milk for cooking has 16 g/100ml fat, where as coconut milks designed for drinking have less (eg Sanatarium coconut milk 2.1g/100ml), but be aware most of this is saturated fat too. The source of fats in other commercial plant based milks is mostly unsaturated fats, but may also be an added fat like sunflower or canola oil, added for texture and energy content, rather than a naturally occurring fat.

Calcium – Plant based milks like rice, soy, coconut and nut milks are not naturally high in calcium. This means to meet your calcium requirements you will either need to choose a fortified commercial variety, choose enough other sources of dietary calcium, or take a calcium supplement. My personal choice is to choose a calcium fortified variety, and we recommend those that contain at least 120mg Calcium per 100ml.

Sugar – Many ( but not all) commercial plant based milks are sweetened with sugar or sugar alternatives to improve flavour. Lactose is the naturally occurring sugar in cow’s milk (and in human breast milk ), and our body usually produces the lactase enzyme from birth to be able to digest this. If you are lactose intolerant, all plant based milks are suitable, however simply swapping to a lactose free cow’s milk could be your best nutritional choice. If making plant based milks at home, keep in mind that large amounts of added sugars will add extra energy to your diet.

Iodine – Cow’s milk and dairy products are a source of dietary Iodine – an important nutrient for thyroid hormone production – especially in pregnancy and childhood. However, milk is not the high source of iodine it once was, since dairy industry stopped using iodophores to clean milk storage vats in the 1960s, and should not be relied upon as the primary source of iodine in the diet.

Plant based milks however are significantly lower in iodine, and swapping these into your diet will mean you definitely need to look for another source to boost your iodine intake.

The good news is there are other great non dairy sources in the diet like fish, shellfish and seaweed and eggs, which all contain more iodine per 100g than milk. On top of this, commercial bakers in Australia must use iodised salt in bread making, so there is an additional source of iodine readily available. As dietitians we typically advocate for using less salt in the diet, but where salt is used, choose iodised salt (unless you have a medical reason not to do so!).

B12 – Cows milk can be an important source of B12, particularly for vegetarians who don’t eat eggs. Some commercial soy milks are fortified with B12 (like Sanitarium So good Essential). If your are vegetarian, it’s worth reading your food labels to check how you can best meet your needs.

So choose your milk wisely, as it is an important source of nutrition in your day. If cow’s milk is not for you, that’s ok, but it’s not always as easy as a simple swap. If your favourite milk choice is lacking in a certain nutrient, make sure you boost your diet with other foods to cover the gaps. For the best individually tailored dietary advice, see an Accredited Practicing Dietitian, particularly if you or your family have any additional health issues.

 

Angela @ Bloom 🌿

(These tips, and other great nutrition stories, are available in our quarterly nutrition news updates. Subscribe to our nutrition newsletter on our home page to be the first to get it, straight in your inbox!)


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We. Love. Summer!

Here at Bloom we do, really, love summer.

And we happily welcome the arrival of the warmer weather, school holidays, Aussie Christmas, and the Bloom Nutrition Studio seasonal newsletter Summer 17/18 edition!

Click the mini-mag link below ⤵️, to get our collection of summer nutrition tidbits for you and your family.

Eat well, live well and enjoy your summer 💛 !

Angela @ Bloom 🌿

 

 

 

 


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Google for some research on school lunches and you can find a vast array of content.

From a news channel running a story about the number of children who attend school with no lunch, or money to buy it, to images of a RRP $100+ shiny stainless steel lunch box, filled with almost nothing but kale, capsicum and carrots painstakingly cut into star shapes, to studies showing many Aussie schools struggle to meet government healthy canteen guidelines.

Good nutrition should be within the reach of all children, not only those with parents who have time to cut vegetables into fun shapes.

In light of this, here at Bloom we are embarking on a series of posts about kids lunches and snacks. About keeping it real, and getting it right, no matter if you’re short on time, sticking to a grocery budget, or navigating the canteen menu.

Check out Julia’s post on her favourite packet snacks to throw into a lunchbox when she’s short on time here… with more to follow on shortcuts to deciphering snack food labels, navigating the school canteen, and other school lunch hacks.

Let us know what you’d like to know more about when it comes to your child’s school lunch… look forward to hearing from you!

Angela @ Bloom 🌿


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And so begins another term, and as I tune into social media tonight I once again see stories of parents being “food shamed” for putting “inappropriate” choices in their child’s lunchbox.

Earlier this year, one South Australian Mum took to social media to air her frustrations after finding THIS note in her child’s lunchbox.

So what do we think about this? Is there a role for the food police in our schools and kindys?

No I don’t think there is.

Let me take a step back and say straight up that YES we do have a problem in Australia with the food our children are eating on a day to day basis. Our most recent data shows that 1 in 4 Australian Children are either overweight or obese. Couple this with the fact that only 5% of children aged 2- 18yrs are eating the recommended 5 serves of veggies and 68% the recommended 2 serves of fruit a day, and it’s clear that something needs to change. In 2012 Australian dietitian Kate Di Prima surveyed 400 school lunch boxes and found that only 21% of parents had sent their children with home cooked foods. Packaged food was common, as were low nutritional value sandwich fillings such as vegemite or jam.

So clearly there’s room for improvement when it comes to lunch boxes, but whose job is it to make sure our children are eating a healthy balanced diet?

In South Australia the Right Bite policy is a government funded initiative that provides guidelines on can be sold at tuck shops. Most states across Australia have similar policies. Red is used to signal those foods that are high in sugar, salt or fat and should not be offered at school. Orange or amber foods should be chosen with caution as they also contain high amounts of sugar,fat or salt but with a slightly improved nutritional value, and green represents those foods that should be eaten and offered regularly.

I do believe our schools should be “health enabling”, and so I’m all for canteens and tuck shops that offer healthy food choices and avoid “red” foods. Our children are learning about food and we want to place them in environments where they can make good choices.

On the home front, however, I don’t think you can force families to adhere to guidelines.

As any dietitian will tell you, when it comes to analysing someone’s diet, it’s your overall dietary pattern that matters. No food is inherently “good” or “bad” for you, but rather it’s how these foods fit within your overall diet that matters. If your diet is generally high in vegetables, fruits, wholegrain cereals and lean proteins, then the occasional cake, chocolate bar or cookie is of very little consequence. A teacher taking a quick glance at a lunchbox is in no position to determine how a particular food item sits within that child’s overall diet for the day, week or month for that matter, and nor should they.

Not all cake is created equal either. How does someone tell the difference between a low sugar, wholemeal flour, zucchini containing chocolate muffin and a plain old chocolate cake? One is clearly a far better choice than the other.

Ultimately I think its up to us as parents, to make sure we are offering a variety of healthy foods across the week, and only offering the occasional treat.

We also want to encourage our children to have a healthy relationship with food, which means understanding that occasional foods are just that, occasional, but they are not “bad” for you when eaten as part of a healthy diet. I worry about children feeling guilty or bad for having a certain foods included in their lunchbox. No one should ever be taught to feel guilty or bad about themselves for their, or their parent’s, food choices. Our focus needs to be on educating children and families about healthy eating, but not food shaming them for the choices they ultimately make.

 

Given our children spend a significant proportion of the day and week at school, you certainly want to be focusing on nutritious lunch boxes that predominantly include whole foods from the core food groups.  I’d hate to think, however that we can never again send a slice of cake to school. Personally I like to send a little bit of leftover birthday cake on my child’s birthday, and I include home baked goods that I’ve modified to be nutritious options on a daily basis.

Keep occasional foods occasional and there won’t be a problem!

If you’re looking for snack ideas to include in your child’s lunchbox, head over to our recipe section.

Julia @ Bloom 🌿